Blizzard’s StarCraft: Cartooned makes the RTS classic look like a kid’s TV show

Blizzard’s StarCraft: Cartooned makes the RTS classic look like a kid’s TV show

Do not be deceived by the above gallery. This is not a prank or a proof of concept. StarCraft: Cartooned is now live at Blizzard’s online store as an official $10 add-on to 2017’s StarCraft Remastered. It redraws every single piece of art in the classic RTS game to look and animate like a children’s cartoon, without otherwise changing the core gameplay.

Specifically, StarCraft: Cartooned looks like a Carbot Animations cartoon—because the YouTube channel in question, operated by Canadian artist and animator Jonathan Burton, was tapped to create Blizzard’s first full cosmetic overhaul mod for a retail game.

The Cartooned DLC does not add any new gameplay or mechanical content to the StarCraft Remastered package. Instead, it transforms every single graphical element in the game, from menus

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Report: Blizzard began making, then canceled, a StarCraft first-person shooter

Report: Blizzard began making, then canceled, a StarCraft first-person shooter

Enlarge (credit: Blizzard Entertainment)

On Wednesday, a vague tweet from a Blizzard game developer hinted at a canceled game project that fans would “never see,” then announced his departure from the company. As questions started flying over what that game was, Kotaku super-reporter Jason Schreier showed up one day later with the scoop: the canceled game, which had been in development for two years, was a first-person shooter set in the StarCraft universe.

In addition to citing “three people familiar with goings-on,” Schreier received a lengthy official response from Blizzard on Thursday that did not deny the game’s existence and cancellation. It reads, in part: “As has been the case at Blizzard numerous times in the past, there is always the possibility that we’ll make the decision to not move forward on a given project.”

This project, which Schreier says was codenamed “Ares” within Blizzard, began as a Battlefield

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BlizzCon 2019 tickets revolve around invasive, poorly reviewed smartphone app

BlizzCon 2019 tickets revolve around invasive, poorly reviewed smartphone app

Enlarge / This image of an exclamation-mark warning next to a BlizzCon logo was uploaded by Blizzard Entertainment itself, not us. (credit: Blizzard Entertainment)

BlizzCon, the annual fan expo hosted by game studio Blizzard Entertainment, typically doesn’t struggle to sell out—and the event’s first wave of tickets did just that on Saturday, May 4. But it wasn’t until those tickets went on sale that the studio’s fans noticed a curious new rule for the event: you can’t enter without installing a third-party, non-Blizzard app.

On April 25, Blizzard announced its plan to require the AXS Ticket app, created by the AXS ticketing service, on either iOS or Android for all BlizzCon ticket purchasers. At its site, Blizzard explains:

The app displays a QR code (one code for all of your tickets), which changes at regular intervals to help guard against dupes and fraud. Because of that, we won’t be

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