Voices in AI – Episode 92: A Conversation with Chris Duffery

Voices in AI – Episode 92: A Conversation with Chris Duffery

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About this Episode

Episode 92 of Voices in AI features Byron speaking with Chris Duffey about the nature of creativity and how machine intelligence can interact with creative concepts.

Listen to this episode or read the full transcript at www.VoicesinAI.com

Transcript Excerpt

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI brought to you by GigaOm and I’m Byron Reese. Today my guest is Chris Duffey. He spearheads Adobe’s Creative Cloud strategic development partnerships across the creative enterprise space. His keynotes have received over 50 million impressions. His work has been featured in a hundred or more global media outlets including The Wall Street Journal, Inc, Adweek and on and on and on. He’s also the author of Superhuman Innovation: Transforming Businesses with Artificial Intelligence. Welcome to the show, Chris.

Chris Duffey: Thanks for having me. Great to be here.

I’d like to start off with: what is intelligence? Read the rest

Mazin Gilbert Headshot

Voices in AI – Episode 91: A Conversation with Mazin Gilbert

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About this Episode

Episode 91 of Voices in AI features Byron speaking with Mazin Gilbert from AT&T Labs about the nature of intelligence and why we have so much trouble defining it.

Listen to this episode or read the full transcript at www.VoicesinAI.com

Transcript Excerpt

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI brought to you by Gigaom. I’m Byron Reese. Today my guest is Mazin Gilbert. He’s a VP of AT&T Labs and their advanced technologies. He holds a PhD in electrical engineering from Liverpool John Moores University, and if that weren’t enough, an MBA from Wharton as well. Welcome to the show, Mazin. 

Mazin Gilbert: Thank you for the invitation, Byron.

I always just like to kind of start out talking about what intelligence is and maybe little different [question], like, why do we have such a hard time defining what intelligence is? Yeah, that’s where I’ll start.Read the rest

Norman Sadeh

Voices in AI – Episode 90: A Conversation with

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About this Episode

Episode 90 of Voices in AI features Byron speaking with Norman Sadeh from Carnegie Mellon University about the nature of intelligence and how AI effects our privacy.

Listen to this episode or read the full transcript at www.VoicesinAI.com

Transcript Excerpt

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI brought to you by GigaOm I’m Byron Reese, today my guest is Norman Sadeh. He is a professor at Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science. He’s affiliated with Cylab which is well known for their seminal work in AI planning and scheduling, and he is an authority on computer privacy. Welcome to the show.

Carnegie Mellon has this amazing reputation in the AI world. It’s arguably second to none. There are a few university campuses that seem to really… there’s Toronto and MIT, and in Carnegie Mellon’s case, how did AI become such a central focus?

Norman Sadeh: Well, … Read the rest

The trick to saving human factory jobs might be teaming up with the machines

The trick to saving human factory jobs might be teaming up with the machines

Enlarge / “Oh brave new industry, that has such bots in’t!” (credit: Javier Pierini / Getty)

The Matrix. Skynet. Roy Batty. Anyone who has watched a science-fiction movie has seen a scenario where factions of humans and machines find themselves locked in mortal combat.

Here in 2019, though, we’re doing what we can to disrupt that vision and steer the course away from human-machine antagonism and more toward cooperation. Instead of robot servants plotting to overthrow their meatbag masters, we’re trying to use machines to augment human skills and strengths—especially in the context of manufacturing, which is the place where we’re most likely to see robots. The rapid push to update manufacturing methods to more smartly integrate human with machine isn’t necessarily as big a deal as the original Industrial Revolution, but it is a big enough deal that analysts have coined a snappy phrase for what we’re going

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For the industrial Internet of Things, defense in depth is a requirement

For the industrial Internet of Things, defense in depth is a requirement

Enlarge / Sensors, sensors everywhere! (credit: Getty / 7postman)

Ars yesterday wrote a big feature on the concept of “Industry 4.0,” the fancy-sounding name that describes the ongoing shift in how products are created from raw materials and distributed along the supply chain to customers.

What the “4.0” revision adds compared to Industries 1.0 through 3.0 is a complex set of linkages between information and operational technologies. (IT stores, transmits, and manipulates data, while “OT” detects and causes changes in physical processes, such as devices for manufacturing or climate control.)

It’s a modular and flexible approach to manufacturing that creates digital links among “smart factories” that are powered by the industrial Internet of Things, big data, and machine learning. And that’s almost enough fancy CEO words to make bingo. At least in this case, the buzzwords aren’t just important-sounding but ultimately meaningless concepts. Similar to how the rise

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The fourth Industrial revolution emerges from AI and the Internet of Things

The fourth Industrial revolution emerges from AI and the Internet of Things

Enlarge / Robots making things! (credit: Getty / Ekkasit Keatsirikul / EyeEm)

Big data, analytics, and machine learning are starting to feel like anonymous business words, but they’re not just overused abstract concepts—those buzzwords represent huge changes in much of the technology we deal with in our daily lives. Some of those changes have been for the better, making our interaction with machines and information more natural and more powerful. Others have helped companies tap into consumers’ relationships, behaviors, locations and innermost thoughts in powerful and often disturbing ways. And the technologies have left a mark on everything from our highways to our homes.

It’s no surprise that the concept of “information about everything” is being aggressively applied to manufacturing contexts. Just as they transformed consumer goods, smart, cheap, sensor-laden devices paired with powerful analytics and algorithms have been changing the industrial world as well over the past decade. The

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hub-07-31-AIerror-Hero-700×525

Why Many Businesses Are Not Ready For AI

Pillars of Readiness

By now, the story is well told on how artificial intelligence is changing businesses, all the way down to impacting core business models. In 2017, Amazon bought Whole Foods then later opened their Amazon Go automated store. Since then, they’ve been using AI to understand and improve the physical retail shopping experience. In 2018, Keller Williams announced a pivot towards becoming an artificial intelligence-driven technology company to compete with the tech-centric entrants into the market like Zillow and Redfin.

These companies are not alone. According to a study by MIT Sloan Management Review, one trillion dollars of new profit will be created from the use of artificial intelligence technologies by 2030. That is roughly 10% of all total profits projected for that time. Still, most companies have yet to implement artificial intelligence in their business. Depending on what study you ready, 70%-80% of all businesses have yet … Read the rest

Doug Lenat Headshot

Voices in AI – Episode 89: A Conversation with Doug Lenat

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About this Episode

Episode 89 of Voices in AI features Byron speaking with Cycorp CEO Douglas Lenat on developing AI and the very nature of intelligence.

Listen to this episode or read the full transcript at www.VoicesinAI.com

Transcript Excerpt

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI brought to you by GigaOm, and I’m Byron Reese. I couldn’t be more excited today. My guest is Douglas Lenat. He is the CEO of Cycorp of Austin, Texas where GigaOm is based, and he’s been a prominent researcher in AI for a long time. He’s been awarded the biannual IJCAI computer and thought award in 1976. He created the machine learning program AM. He worked on (symbolic, not statistical) machine learning with his AM and Eurisko programs, knowledge representation, cognitive economy, blackboard systems and what he dubbed in 1984 as “ontological engineering.”

He’s worked in military simulations, numerous projects for the government Read the rest

Sameer Maskey Headshot

Voices in AI – Episode 87: A Conversation with Sameer Maskey

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About this Episode

Episode 87 of Voices in AI features Byron speaking with Sameer Maskey of Fusemachines about the development of machine learning, languages and AI capabilities.

Listen to this one-hour episode or read the full transcript at www.VoicesinAI.com

Transcript Excerpt

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI brought to you by GigaOm and I’m Byron Reese. Today my guest is Sameer Maskey. He is the founder and CEO of Fusemachines and he’s an adjunct assistant professor at Columbia. He holds an undergraduate degree in Math and Physics from Bates College and a PhD in Computer Science from Columbia University as well. Welcome to the show, Sameer.

Sameer Maskey: Thanks Byron, glad to be here.

Can you recall the first time you ever heard the term ‘artificial intelligence’ or has it always just been kind of a fixture of your life?

It’s always been a fixture of my life. … Read the rest

Amir_Husain headshot

Voices in AI – Episode 86: A Conversation with Amir Husain

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About this Episode

Episode 86 of Voices in AI features Byron speaking with fellow author Amir Husain about the nature of Artificial Intelligence and Amir’s book The Sentient Machine.

Listen to this one-hour episode or read the full transcript at www.VoicesinAI.com

Transcript Excerpt

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI brought to you by GigaOm, and I’m Byron Reese. Today my guest is Amir Husain. He is the founder and CEO of SparkCognition Inc., and he’s the author of The Sentient Machine, a fine book about artificial intelligence. In addition to that, he is a member of the AI task force with the Center for New American Security. He is a member of the board of advisors at UT Austin’s Department of Computer Science. He’s a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. In short, he is a very busy guy, but has found 30 minutes to join Read the rest