Verizon’s Galaxy Note 10+ 5G has Been Tested

Verizon’s Galaxy Note 10+ 5G has Been Tested


A leak from last week showed the Samsung Galaxy Note 10+ 5G as a possible Verizon exclusive and now that same device has stopped by the FCC for testing. I’m not sure we learn anything new, thanks to the countless leaks in recent weeks, but it’s always cool to see a device’s 5G tested, since 5G is still so new.

The Verizon Galaxy Note 10+ 5G showed up as model SM-N976V, with that “V” representing Verizon in the way that older Galaxy phone models used to tip off carrier variants. The device has support for Verizon CDMA and LTE, as well as two 5G mmW bands that Big Red uses for their 5G Ultra Wideband. Those two bands are n260 (39GHz) and n261 (28GHz).

There is a whole new set of tests from the FCC for 5G, which is the cool part of this all. This particular filing shows … Read the rest

Continue Reading
A New NVIDIA SHIELD Android TV Box Showed Up at the FCC!

A New NVIDIA SHIELD Android TV Box Showed Up at the FCC!


Remember back in June when we saw hints of a refreshed NVIDIA SHIELD TV box possibly on the way? That new NVIDIA SHIELD TV stopped by the FCC today and isn’t being shy about what it’ll do.

The device, which is clearly referred to as “SHIELD Android TV Game Console,” was tested for Bluetooth and WiFi. We also know from the name that it does indeed run Android TV. The FCC ID is VOB-P3430 and the model number is that last part, P3430.

NVIDIA’s filing has mostly been opened up, but as is usual, they hid any photos of the device for some time. Those will be revealed in January of 2020, though the device will likely be announced well before then.

As a user of both previous NVIDIA SHIELD TVs, I can tell you that this is something to keep an eye on if you’ve been scoping the Android … Read the rest

Continue Reading
FCC gives ISPs another $563 million to build rural-broadband networks

FCC gives ISPs another $563 million to build rural-broadband networks

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Bonilla1879)

More than 220,000 unserved rural homes and businesses in 24 states will get broadband access because of funding authorized yesterday by the Federal Communications Commission, the agency said. In all, the FCC authorized more than $563 million for distribution to ISPs over the next decade. It’s the latest payout from the commission’s Connect America Fund, which was created in 2011.

Under program rules, ISPs that receive funding must build out to 40 percent of the required homes and businesses within three years and an additional 20 percent each year until completing the buildout at the end of the sixth year.

The money is being distributed primarily to smaller ISPs in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas, and Virginia. Verizon, which is getting $18.5

Read the rest Continue Reading
Ajit Pai’s new gift to cable companies would kill local fees and rules

Ajit Pai’s new gift to cable companies would kill local fees and rules

Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai speaking at a press conference on October 1, 2018, in Washington DC. (credit: Getty Images | Mark Wilson )

Ajit Pai is continuing his multi-year battle against local broadband regulation with a plan that would stop cities and towns from using their authority over cable TV networks to regulate Internet access.

Chairman Pai’s proposal, scheduled for a vote at the Federal Communications Commission’s August 1 meeting, would also limit the fees that municipalities can charge cable companies. Cable industry lobbyists have urged the FCC to stop cities and towns from assessing fees on the revenue cable companies make from broadband.

If approved, Pai’s proposal would “Prohibit LFAs [local franchising authorities] from using their video franchising authority to regulate most non-cable services, including broadband Internet service, offered over cable systems by incumbent cable operators.” Pai’s proposal complains that “some states and localities are

Read the rest Continue Reading
Galaxy Note 10 Stops at the FCC, Dancing the No Headphone Jack Dance

Galaxy Note 10 Stops at the FCC, Dancing the No Headphone Jack Dance


The Samsung Galaxy Note 10 doesn’t have a headphone jack. Thanks to an accidental posting of images of the phone to the FCC last night, that much is confirmed. It’s sad, but expected at this point after countless rumors suggesting this would be the case.

Mad about the no headphone jack thing? Pro things don’t need headphone jacks, they need S Pens and Bixby buttons. Don’t like that response? Tough. TOUGH. This is Samsung’s world. Can I get you a cupcake?

Note 10 FCC

Note 10 FCC

The FCC filings (for models SM-N975 and SM-N976) didn’t provide anything else groundbreaking, but do confirm Bluetooth 5.0 and WiFi 6. You can see in the image above that the phone will be large, yet similarly sized to the Galaxy Note 9 (161.9 x 76.4mm). That means we’ll get tiny bezels and a bigger display in a shell like we saw a year ago. Progress!

// FCC [… Read the rest

Continue Reading
AT&T’s robocall-blocking expansion won’t block spam calls unless you pay extra

AT&T’s robocall-blocking expansion won’t block spam calls unless you pay extra

Enlarge / AT&T’s Call Protect and Mobile Security apps for Android. (credit: AT&T)

AT&T yesterday said it will add “automatic fraud blocking and suspected spam-call alerts” to mobile phone lines for no added cost, but the carrier still imposes limits on blocking of spam calls unless customers pay extra.

“New AT&T Mobility consumer lines will come with the anti-robocall service. Millions of existing AT&T customers also will have it automatically added to their accounts over the coming months,” AT&T’s announcement said.

Despite the change, customers will still have to manually add undesired phone numbers to block lists or pay $4 a month to send all suspected spam calls to voicemail. That’s because this is little more than an expansion of AT&T’s Call Protect service, which has a basic free tier and a paid tier with automatic blocking of spam calls.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source link Read the rest

Continue Reading
“This is crazy”: FCC kills part of San Francisco’s broadband-competition law

“This is crazy”: FCC kills part of San Francisco’s broadband-competition law

Enlarge / Lombard Street in San Francisco. (credit: Getty Images | Michael Lee)

The Federal Communications Commission today voted to preempt part of a San Francisco ordinance that promotes broadband competition in apartment buildings and other multi-tenant structures. But it’s not clear exactly what effect the preemption will have, because San Francisco says the FCC’s Republican majority has misinterpreted what the law does.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s plan partially overturns San Francisco’s Article 52, which lets Internet service providers use the existing wiring inside multi-unit buildings even if another ISP already serves the building. The FCC said it’s preempting the law “to the extent it requires the sharing of in-use wiring.” But Pai’s proposal admits the FCC doesn’t know whether the San Francisco law actually requires sharing of in-use wiring, which makes it difficult to understand whether the FCC preemption will change anything in practice.

San Francisco itself

Read the rest Continue Reading
House votes to block Ajit Pai’s plan to kill San Francisco broadband law

House votes to block Ajit Pai’s plan to kill San Francisco broadband law

Enlarge (credit: Steve Johnson / Flickr)

The US House of Representatives has voted to block Ajit Pai’s attempt to kill a San Francisco ordinance designed to promote broadband competition in apartment buildings.

As we reported last week, the Federal Communications Commission chair has scheduled a July 10 vote on a measure that would preempt the San Francisco city ordinance, which lets Internet service providers use the existing wiring inside multiunit residential and commercial properties even if the wiring is already used by another ISP that serves the building. The ordinance applies only when the inside wiring belongs to the property owner, but it makes it easier for ISPs to compete in many multiunit buildings already served by another provider.

Pai claimed that the city’s rule “deters broadband deployment” and infringes on the FCC’s regulation of cable wiring. But US Rep. Katie Porter (D-Calif.) proposed a budget amendment that

Read the rest Continue Reading
FCC lets Verizon lock cell phones to network for 60 days after activation

FCC lets Verizon lock cell phones to network for 60 days after activation

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Peter Dazeley)

Verizon yesterday received the government’s permission to lock handsets to its network for 60 days after each device’s activation, despite open-access rules that apply to one of Verizon’s key spectrum licenses.

The Federal Communications Commission waiver approval said 60-day locks will “allow Verizon to better combat identity theft and other forms of handset-related fraud.”

Verizon generally sells its phones unlocked, meaning they can be used on any carrier’s network as long as the device and network are compatible with each other. This is largely because of rules the FCC applied to 700MHz spectrum that Verizon bought at auction in 2008. The 700MHz spectrum rules say that a license holder may not “disable features on handsets it provides to customers… nor configure handsets it provides to prohibit use of such handsets on other providers’ networks.”

Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source Read the rest

Continue Reading
FCC battles meteorologists again over plan to help wireless industry

FCC battles meteorologists again over plan to help wireless industry

Enlarge / Artist’s rendering of a NOAA weather satellite. (credit: NOAA/NASA)

Meteorologists and other experts are urging the Federal Communications Commission to drop a spectrum-sharing plan that they say could interfere with transmissions of weather-satellite imagery.

The dispute is over the 1675-1680MHz frequencies and is separate from the other FCC/weather controversy we’ve been covering, which involves the 24GHz band and has pitted the FCC against NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the US Navy.

The American Geophysical Union (AGU), American Meteorological Society (AMS), and National Weather Association (NWA) told the FCC in a filing last week that its plan for 1675-1680MHz should be scrapped because of the “likelihood of interference with the reception of weather satellite imagery and relayed environmental data to receive-only antennas that members of America’s weather, water, and climate enterprise use.”

Read 31 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source link Read the rest

Continue Reading