Poll: Which Music Service Do You Use?

Poll: Which Music Service Do You Use?


For some reason we haven’t asked which music service you use since like 2016 or so. We’re clearly not doing our jobs properly, but with the hot topic around these parts right now being music services, let’s do an update on it!

Which music service are you guys using? Are you sticking with Google Play Music, even with the lack of updates? Did you make an early switch to YouTube Music hoping that Google would take care of you (they haven’t)? Are you a Spotify bro? Did you just give up on them all and choose Apple Music? Maybe you like them quality beats and pay for Tidal?

Let us know.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

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Amazon Music Unlimited is growing faster than Apple Music or Spotify, report says

Amazon Music Unlimited is growing faster than Apple Music or Spotify, report says

Enlarge / An Amazon Echo smart speaker. (credit: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

Amazon grew its Music Unlimited streaming service by more than 70% in the past year, according to data by Midia Research published by the Financial Times. The service currently has approximately 32 million subscribers. However, the report didn’t clarify whether that includes trial subscriptions as well as paid ones.

Amazon Unlimited Music is still smaller than its biggest competitors. Apple services head Eddie Cue recently revealed that Apple Music has about 60 million subscribers. Spotify has more than 100 million. Google has offered a variety of streaming services via YouTube that it has shuttered, rebranded, and shuffled around, making it difficult to quantify the company’s traction with music listeners. In any case, Amazon still has a lot of catching up to do.

Midia Research credits the rapid growth of Amazon Unlimited Music to the proliferation of Amazon

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Answers to some of your iTunes questions: Old libraries, Windows, and more

Answers to some of your iTunes questions: Old libraries, Windows, and more

SAN JOSE, Calif.—After much speculation and fanfare in the press, Apple confirmed today that it will sunset iTunes in the next version of macOS and spin its functionality into three new apps—Apple Music, Apple Podcasts, and Apple TV. As we noted earlier, this marks the end of an era of sorts on the Mac—but there were plenty of unanswered questions. What features will Music retain from iTunes? And what happens to Windows users who are dependent on iTunes?

While some details are still fuzzy and will remain that way until we start digging into the beta releases, we got some broad answers from Apple on those top-level questions.

Old iTunes libraries and files

Apple Music in macOS Catalina will import users’ existing music libraries from iTunes in their entirety, Apple says. That includes not just

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Apple will soon kill off iTunes and, with it, an entire era of music history

Apple will soon kill off iTunes and, with it, an entire era of music history

Enlarge / The new Apple Podcasts app for Mac. (credit: Ron Amadeo)

SAN JOSE, Calif.—As part of a slate of upcoming software updates, Apple will close the door on one of its most iconic pieces of software: iTunes. The company will split the application up into multiple, more-focused apps on the Mac: Apple Music for music, Apple TV for TV and movies, and Apple Podcasts for podcasts.

iTunes—a program for managing your media library, listening to songs, and buying new content—played a key part in the digital revolution of the 2000s after it first launched in 2001. Its impact started with music. iTunes was partly credited with slowing the severe bleeding to piracy the recording industry faced amid the popularity of the MP3 boom on peer-to-peer file-sharing applications like Napster. And the program was also the home base for the iPod, one of the first of many products

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What to expect from Apple’s WWDC 2019 keynote next week

What to expect from Apple’s WWDC 2019 keynote next week

Enlarge / Neon emoji and animoji images accompanied the invites to press. (credit: Apple)

Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) starts this Monday, June 3, with a stage presentation by Apple executives at 10am Pacific Time. WWDC is usually one of the two biggest Apple events of the year (the other is the now-recurring iPhone/Apple Watch event in the fall), and it generally focuses on software.

It has become tradition for Apple to introduce new versions of its operating systems to developers at WWDC. Those systems include iOS for iPhone, iPad, and iPod; macOS for Mac; watchOS for Apple Watch; and tvOS for Apple TV and Apple TV 4K. In fact, these are some of the primary purposes of the event. So you can expect to see detailed presentations during Apple’s keynote on each of those, plus deeper dives for developers in the various sessions at the convention center, which

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