Bethesda Releases DOOM and DOOM II for Android to Celebrate 25th Anniversary

Bethesda Releases DOOM and DOOM II for Android to Celebrate 25th Anniversary


DOOM is celebrating its 25th anniversary, and to commemorate the milestone, Bethesda has published both DOOM and DOOM II to Google Play for Android devices. It’s a beautiful day in Hell, folks!

Both titles are priced at $4.99, though, you’ll notice the DOOM II release features 20 additional levels made by the ever-loving DOOM community. It also offers local multiplayer and local co-op play.

Of course, if you didn’t already know, those who own a SHIELD TV can play DOOM 3: BFG Edition, which includes DOOM 3, plus the first two DOOM titles. It runs great, too.

Stop reading and go kill demons.

Google Play Links: DOOM | DOOM II

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It's <em>Doom</em>, only streamed more efficiently to your phone thanks to Orion.

Bethesda says its Orion tech can make all cloud gaming better, faster

LOS ANGELES—Bethesda Softworks announced Sunday that it is getting involved in the increasingly competitive field of cloud gaming. But rather than announcing a service to compete with the likes of Google Stadia or Microsoft’s Project Xcloud, Bethesda’s Orion system is focused on improving streaming performance on the platforms that already exist.

While most cloud gaming efforts try to improve performance by throwing hardware at the problem—often in the form of prime data center locations loaded with high-end servers—Bethesda says Orion is instead incorporated “at the game engine level.” The result of what Bethesda calls “years of research and development,” the company says its group of patented Orion technologies can optimize frame rendering time by approximately 20 percent per frame. Improved compression also leads to streams that require 40 percent lower bandwidth for the same quality, reducing

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Fallout 76 updates promise turnaround after “well-deserved criticism”

Fallout 76 updates promise turnaround after “well-deserved criticism”

LOS ANGELES—After what Bethesda’s Todd Howard admitted on stage was some “well-deserved criticism” at the launch of Fallout 76, Bethesda rolled out the first phase of its turnaround plan for the game at its E3 press conference tonight.

That plan starts with Nuclear Winter, a 52-player Battle Royale mode that sees players fighting for the role of “overseer” using Fallout‘s usual lineup of guns, power armor, and some “exclusive perks” to upgrade your own abilities. That mode will be available as a “sneak peek” during a free trial of the full game starting June 10 and running through June 17.

Then, in the fall, a free update being called “Wastelanders” will introduce new elements including a full quest line, new rewards, full dialogue trees, and the much-requested return of human non-player characters. Players will also be able to choose between siding with two different factions: Settlers and Raiders.

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Bethesda revives ‘80s PC series Commander Keen as a… free-to-play mobile game

Bethesda revives ‘80s PC series Commander Keen as a… free-to-play mobile game

PC gamers of a certain era fondly remember Commander Keen, one of the most technically proficient side-scrolling action series to land on MS-DOS. Fans of its creators, id Software (perhaps better known for Doom and Quake), have always wondered when the relatively cutesy series might see a revival since its halcyon PC years of 1990-91.

That day was Sunday, as announced by Bethesda at its E3 press conference. But fans may not have seen this version of Keen coming.

The new Commander Keen, as shown in the above gallery, will “soft-launch” on iOS and Android “this summer” as a free-to-play platforming game. Gameplay specifics were not clarified either at the press conference or the game’s brand-new announcement site, but this smartphone game appears to revolve around tapping on smartphone screens to direct players’ upward hops (recalling ’80s arcade games

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Did Fallout 76 launch too early or just in time to be saved?

Did Fallout 76 launch too early or just in time to be saved?

There’s a famous quote around the game industry often attributed to legendary Nintendo designer Shigeru Miyamoto: “A delayed game is eventually good, but a rushed game is forever bad.” That may have been true when he said it, but it seems a little outdated in today’s “launch now and patch it later” game industry.

I’ve been thinking about this a lot since listening to an IGN interview with Bethesda’s Todd Howard yesterday about what he admits was a “bumpy” rollout for Fallout 76 last year. In the interview, Howard acknowledges it was a “very difficult development on that game to get it where it was,” noting that “any time you’re going to do something new like that you know you’re going to have your bumps.”

Fallout 76 was savaged by critics

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Bethesda’s latest Elder Scrolls adventure taken down amid cries of plagiarism

Bethesda’s latest Elder Scrolls adventure taken down amid cries of plagiarism

[Update 3:52 pm Eastern: While the original Facebook post linking to the “Elsweyr” adventure has been taken down, the files in question are still accessible via Bethesda’s Dropbox.]

A promotional Elder Scrolls-themed tabletop RPG adventure released by Bethesda Tuesday contained widespread instances of apparent plagiarism from a Dungeons & Dragons adventure published by Wizards of the Coast in 2016. That adventure was pulled down from the Internet Wednesday afternoon, and Bethesda now says it is “investigat[ing] the source.”

Bethesda’s pen-and-paper Elder Scrolls “Elsweyr” adventure (archived here for reference) contains text that in total seems only slightly reworded from the D&D adventure “The Black Road,” written by Paige Leitman and Ben Heisler

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