Nvidia RTX 2080 Super hands-on: The result when AMD is out of striking distance

Nvidia RTX 2080 Super hands-on: The result when AMD is out of striking distance

Earlier this month, Nvidia kicked a stool out from under AMD’s feet, just as the graphics-card sector began heating up anew. AMD was set to land a serious blow with new RX 5700 cards in the “pricey but reasonable” range—a range that Nvidia had failed to capture with its “entry-level” RTX cards, the 2060 and 2070. Nvidia responded to AMD’s news by unveiling and launching a surprise pair of solid “Super” cards. AMD responded with its own price cut (and a claim that this price-war dance was its plan all along).

As these similarly specced cards jostled for the “$400ish” crown, the winner was ultimately consumers. At every price point, new GPU buyers can expect a solid bang-for-buck quotient between the $349

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AMD says its Ryzen 3000 isn’t just cheaper—it’s better

AMD says its Ryzen 3000 isn’t just cheaper—it’s better

Enlarge / AMD provided infrared photos showing its new Ryzen 3700x running cooler than an Intel i7-9700k. (credit: AMD Computex slide deck)

AMD’s new line of Ryzen 3000 desktop CPUs will benefit from the same 7nm manufacturing process as the company’s new Navi-powered GPUs. Much of the tech community’s hype is for the biggest and baddest of the bunch: the 16-core, 32-thread Ryzen 9 3950x. But there’s an entire new line ranging from the $749 3950x down to a relatively-modest $199 3600X—and AMD is gunning for Intel every step of the way.

What’s really interesting is, this time around, AMD is not just pitching cheaper parts and “good-enough” performance—the company is claiming top-dog stats, along with thermal and power efficiency wins. The Ryzen 9 3700x is listed at $329, while Intel’s i7-9700k is currently available for about $410. But according to AMD’s slides, the Ryzen part also outperforms the

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Lenovo adds AMD Ryzen Pro-powered laptops to its ThinkPad family

Lenovo adds AMD Ryzen Pro-powered laptops to its ThinkPad family

Lenovo is adding more choices to its beloved and iconic ThinkPad lineup this year: the new T495, T495s, and X395 laptops are all powered by AMD’s Ryzen 7 Pro processors with integrated Vega graphics. With the same design and MIL-spec level of durability, these new ThinkPads will give customers the option to go with AMD without sacrificing what they love about the premium ThinkPad lineup.

The ThinkPad T495 and T495s models are 14-inch laptops while the X395 measures in at 13 inches. They will look similar to the T490 and T490s Intel-based laptops announced last month because Lenovo essentially took the same frames and stuck AMD APUs inside. That means they all have MIL-spec tested designs and features like far-field mics for VoIP conferences, Lenovo’s camera privacy shutter, and optional PrivacyGuide screen filter.

The 14-inch displays on the

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AMD to launch new 7nm Navi GPU, Rome CPU in 3rd quarter

Cray, AMD to build 1.5 exaflops supercomputer for US government

Enlarge / AMD CEO Lisa Su, holding a Rome processor. The large chip in the middle is the 14nm I/O chip; around it are pairs of 7nm chiplets containing the CPU cores. (credit: AMD)

AMD and Cray have announced that they’re building “Frontier,” a new supercomputer for the Department of Energy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goal is to deliver a system that can perform 1.5 exaflops: 1.5×1018 floating point operations per second.

By way of comparison, a single Nvidia RTX 2080 GPU manages about 14 teraflops of compute performance with 32-bit numbers. Frontier will achieve 100,000 times more. The fastest supercomputer in the Top 500 list weighs in at 200 petaflops, or 0.2 exaflops. As things stand, it’d take the top 160 machines on the list to match Frontier’s performance.

Frontier will use custom versions of AMD’s Epyc processors (likely Zen 3 or Zen 4), matched

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HP Chromebook 14 review: One of the first AMD Chromebooks, tested

HP Chromebook 14 review: One of the first AMD Chromebooks, tested

Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino)

AMD wants in on the Chromebook craze. A few OEMs, including HP, Acer, and Lenovo, announced AMD-powered Chromebooks at CES this year, and those devices are just starting to become available. Intel processors power most Chromebooks available today, but now individual customers and businesses will be able to choose from a small, but growing, pool of AMD-powered devices.

Unsurprisingly, HP’s Chromebook 14 with AMD processors and integrated Radeon graphics appeals to the largest group in the Chromebook market—those who want a low-powered Chrome OS device for home or school use. Starting at $269, this Chromebook is not meant to compete with Google’s Pixelbook or the fancier Chromebooks toward which professionals gravitate. Since the new Chromebook 14 borrows a lot from previous models, we tested it out to see the gains (if any) an AMD-powered Chromebook provides over Intel-powered devices.

Look and feel

Manufacturers have been elevating

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AMD to launch new 7nm Navi GPU, Rome CPU in 3rd quarter

AMD to launch new 7nm Navi GPU, Rome CPU in 3rd quarter

Enlarge / AMD CEO Lisa Su, holding a Rome processor. The large chip in the middle is the 14nm I/O chip; around it are pairs of 7nm chiplets containing the CPU cores. (credit: AMD)

In its earnings call, AMD offered a little more detail about the launch of its next-generation processors, built using the Zen 2 architecture and TSMC’s 7nm manufacturing process, and new GPU architecture, Navi, again built on 7nm. Server-oriented EPYC-branded chips (codenamed Rome) should be shipping to customers in the third quarter of this year, and so too will Navi-based video cards.

In November last year, AMD outlined the details of the Zen 2 design. It makes a number of architectural improvements to shore up some of Zen’s weaker areas (for example, it now has native 256-bit floating point units to handle AVX2 instructions; the original Zen only had 128-bit units, so it had to split

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Blackmagic eGPU Pro mini-review: Quiet, fast, and extremely expensive—like a Mac

Blackmagic eGPU Pro mini-review: Quiet, fast, and extremely expensive—like a Mac

There are many criticisms of Apple’s Mac products, but one of the most commonly cited is that they often don’t have graphics power that’s comparable to what you’d see in similarly priced Windows machines. Unfortunately, the company currently offers no desktop tower in which you could, say, slot two super-powerful gaming graphics cards, either.

Some of that could change soon when Apple moves to its own silicon on Macs or when it introduces a new Mac Pro. But for now, the company’s official answer to this line of criticism is doubling down on external GPU support in macOS. Support for this began during the High Sierra cycle and was expanded upon in some helpful ways in last year’s Mojave OS release.

In addition to providing software support for eGPUs, Apple has developed what is more or less its official-ish eGPU

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