Steam uses machine learning for its new game recommendation engine

Steam uses machine learning for its new game recommendation engine

Enlarge / The new recommendation engine is part of a new experimental Steam Labs branding.

For years now, Valve has been testing new approaches to filter the glut of Steam games down to the ones in which individual users are most likely to show an interest. To that end, the company is today rolling out a machine-learning-powered “Interactive Recommender” trained on “billions of play sessions” from the Steam user base.

In the past, Steam has relied largely on crowd-sourced metadata like user-provided tags, user-curated lists, aggregate review scores, and sales data to drive its recommendation algorithms. But the new Interactive Recommender is different, Valve says, because it works without any initial internal or external information about the games themselves (save for the release date). “Instead, the model learns about the games for itself during the training process,” Valve says. “The model infers properties of games by learning what users

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Voices in AI – Episode 91: A Conversation with Mazin Gilbert

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About this Episode

Episode 91 of Voices in AI features Byron speaking with Mazin Gilbert from AT&T Labs about the nature of intelligence and why we have so much trouble defining it.

Listen to this episode or read the full transcript at www.VoicesinAI.com

Transcript Excerpt

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI brought to you by Gigaom. I’m Byron Reese. Today my guest is Mazin Gilbert. He’s a VP of AT&T Labs and their advanced technologies. He holds a PhD in electrical engineering from Liverpool John Moores University, and if that weren’t enough, an MBA from Wharton as well. Welcome to the show, Mazin. 

Mazin Gilbert: Thank you for the invitation, Byron.

I always just like to kind of start out talking about what intelligence is and maybe little different [question], like, why do we have such a hard time defining what intelligence is? Yeah, that’s where I’ll start.Read the rest

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Voices in AI – Episode 89: A Conversation with Doug Lenat

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About this Episode

Episode 89 of Voices in AI features Byron speaking with Cycorp CEO Douglas Lenat on developing AI and the very nature of intelligence.

Listen to this episode or read the full transcript at www.VoicesinAI.com

Transcript Excerpt

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI brought to you by GigaOm, and I’m Byron Reese. I couldn’t be more excited today. My guest is Douglas Lenat. He is the CEO of Cycorp of Austin, Texas where GigaOm is based, and he’s been a prominent researcher in AI for a long time. He’s been awarded the biannual IJCAI computer and thought award in 1976. He created the machine learning program AM. He worked on (symbolic, not statistical) machine learning with his AM and Eurisko programs, knowledge representation, cognitive economy, blackboard systems and what he dubbed in 1984 as “ontological engineering.”

He’s worked in military simulations, numerous projects for the government Read the rest

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Voices in AI – Episode 88: A Conversation with Ron Green

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About this Episode

Episode 88 of Voices in AI features Byron speaking with Ron Green of KUNGFU.AI about how companies integrate AI and machine learning into their business models.

Listen to this episode or read the full transcript at www.VoicesinAI.com

Transcript Excerpt

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI brought to you by GigaOm and I’m Byron Reese. Today my guest is Ron Green. Ron is the CTO over at KUNGFU.AI. He holds a BA in Computer Science from the University of Texas at Austin, and he holds a Master of Science from the University of Sussex in Evolutionary and Adaptive Systems. His company, KUNGFU.AI is a professional services company that helps companies start and accelerate artificial intelligence projects. I asked him [to be] on the show today because I wanted to do an episode that was a little more ‘hands-on’ about how an enterprise today can apply this Read the rest

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Voices in AI – Episode 87: A Conversation with Sameer Maskey

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About this Episode

Episode 87 of Voices in AI features Byron speaking with Sameer Maskey of Fusemachines about the development of machine learning, languages and AI capabilities.

Listen to this one-hour episode or read the full transcript at www.VoicesinAI.com

Transcript Excerpt

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI brought to you by GigaOm and I’m Byron Reese. Today my guest is Sameer Maskey. He is the founder and CEO of Fusemachines and he’s an adjunct assistant professor at Columbia. He holds an undergraduate degree in Math and Physics from Bates College and a PhD in Computer Science from Columbia University as well. Welcome to the show, Sameer.

Sameer Maskey: Thanks Byron, glad to be here.

Can you recall the first time you ever heard the term ‘artificial intelligence’ or has it always just been kind of a fixture of your life?

It’s always been a fixture of my life. … Read the rest

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Microsoft open sources algorithm that gives Bing some of its smarts

Microsoft open sources algorithm that gives Bing some of its smarts

Enlarge / The Eiffel Tower. (credit: Pedro Szekely)

Search engines today are more than just the dumb keyword matchers they used to be. You can ask a question—say, “How tall is the tower in Paris?”—and they’ll tell you that the Eiffel Tower is 324 meters (1,063 feet) tall, about the same as an 81-story building. They can do this even though the question never actually names the tower.

How do they do this? As with everything else these days, they use machine learning. Machine-learning algorithms are used to build vectors—essentially, long lists of numbers—that in some sense represent their input data, whether it be text on a webpage, images, sound, or videos. Bing captures billions of these vectors for all the different kinds of media that it indexes. To search the vectors, Microsoft uses an algorithm it calls SPTAG (“Space Partition Tree and Graph”). An input query is converted

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Why Google believes machine learning is its future

Why Google believes machine learning is its future

Enlarge / Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during the Google I/O Developers Conference on May 7, 2019. (credit: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

One of the most interesting demos at this week’s Google I/O keynote featured a new version of Google’s voice assistant that’s due out later this year. A Google employee asked the Google Assistant to bring up her photos and then show her photos with animals. She tapped one and said, “Send it to Justin.” The photo was dropped into the messaging app.

From there, things got more impressive.

“Hey Google, send an email to Jessica,” she said. “Hi Jessica, I just got back from Yellowstone and completely fell in love with it.” The phone transcribed her words, putting “Hi Jessica” on its own line.

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Blockchain, zero-code machine learning coming to Azure

Blockchain, zero-code machine learning coming to Azure

Enlarge (credit: Caetano Candal Sato / Flickr)

Microsoft’s annual developer conference kicks off on Monday, and the company will no doubt have all manner of things to announce for Azure and, if we’re lucky, Windows. To whet our appetites, the company has unveiled a crop of new Azure and Internet-of-Things services with, as we should no doubt expect these days, a focus on machine learning and blockchain.

First up are some new capabilities under the cognitive-services banner. These are the services that are most similar to human cognition: image recognition, speech-to-text, translation, and so on. Microsoft is adding a new category of service that it’s calling “Decision.” In this category are services that make recommendations to aid decision-making. Microsoft is putting some existing services into this category: Content Moderator (which tries to automatically detect offensive or undesirable text, images, and video) and Anomaly Detector (which examines time series data

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Voices in AI – Episode 86: A Conversation with Amir Husain

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About this Episode

Episode 86 of Voices in AI features Byron speaking with fellow author Amir Husain about the nature of Artificial Intelligence and Amir’s book The Sentient Machine.

Listen to this one-hour episode or read the full transcript at www.VoicesinAI.com

Transcript Excerpt

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI brought to you by GigaOm, and I’m Byron Reese. Today my guest is Amir Husain. He is the founder and CEO of SparkCognition Inc., and he’s the author of The Sentient Machine, a fine book about artificial intelligence. In addition to that, he is a member of the AI task force with the Center for New American Security. He is a member of the board of advisors at UT Austin’s Department of Computer Science. He’s a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. In short, he is a very busy guy, but has found 30 minutes to join Read the rest

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Voices in AI – Episode 85: A Conversation with Ilya Sutskever

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About this Episode

Episode 85 of Voices in AI features host Byron Reese and Ilya Sutskever of Open AI talk about the future of general intelligence and the ramifications of building a computer smarter than us.

Listen to this one-hour episode or read the full transcript at www.VoicesinAI.com

Transcript Excerpt

Byron Reese: This is Voices in AI brought to you by GigaOm and I’m Byron Reese. Today my guest is Ilya Sutskever. He is the co-founder and the chief scientist at OpenAI, one of the most fascinating institutions on the face of this planet. Welcome to the show Ilya.

Ilya Sutskever: Great to be here.

Just to bring the listeners up to speed, talk a little bit about what OpenAI is, what its mission is, and kind of where it’s at. Set the scene for us of what OpenAI does.

Great, for sure. The best way to describe OpenAI … Read the rest

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