Microsoft publishes first Edge for macOS preview, promises to make it truly “Mac-like”

Microsoft publishes first Edge for macOS preview, promises to make it truly “Mac-like”

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One of the most important ways that Microsoft wants to make the new Chromium-based Edge different from the current EdgeHTML-based Edge is in its support for other platforms. The original Edge was, for no good reason, tied to Windows 10, meaning that Web developers on platforms such as Windows 7 or macOS had no way of testing how their pages looked, short of firing up a Windows 10 virtual machine.

The new browser is, in contrast, a cross-platform affair. The first preview builds were published for Windows 10, with versions for Windows 7, 8, and 8.1 promised soon; today, these are joined by builds for macOS.

The macOS version resembles the Windows 10 builds that we’ve seen so far, but it isn’t identical. Microsoft wants to be a good citizen on macOS by producing not just an application that fits the platform’s

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Microsoft’s plan for Edge: Integrated IE compatibility, better privacy

Microsoft’s plan for Edge: Integrated IE compatibility, better privacy

Microsoft has outlined its plans for the next stage of development for the new Chromium-based Edge browser, and those plans include a trio of new features.

The first is a big nod to enterprise customers: a built-in Internet Explorer mode. Chrome has a number of extensions that accomplish much the same thing—they create a new tab in the browser and use the Internet Explorer 11 engine, rather than the Chrome engine, to draw that tab. For Edge, this capability will be built in.

Enterprises can already create a compatibility list, the Enterprise Mode Site List, which the current Edge browser uses to know which (internal, line-of-business) sites should be shown in Internet Explorer 11. The new Edge will use this same list to determine when to use Internet Explorer.

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