Apple moves Mac Pro production from Texas to China

Apple moves Mac Pro production from Texas to China

Enlarge / An inside view of the new Mac Pro. (credit: Apple)

Apple is manufacturing the new Mac Pro in China, marking a change from the previous Mac Pro that was made in the US.

Apple made the previous Mac Pro in Austin, Texas, beginning in 2013. But with the new Mac Pro unveiled this month being made in China, Apple is “shifting abroad production of what had been its only major device assembled in the US as trade tensions escalate between the Trump administration and Beijing,” The Wall Street Journal reported today.

“The tech giant has tapped contractor Quanta Computer Inc. to manufacture the $6,000 desktop computer and is ramping up production at a factory near Shanghai,” according to the Journal’s sources. “Quanta’s facility is close to other Apple suppliers across Asia, making it possible for Apple to achieve lower shipping costs than if it shipped components

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Guidemaster: Is Valve Index the best virtual reality system to buy in 2019?

Guidemaster: Is Valve Index the best virtual reality system to buy in 2019?

Enlarge / Front row: PlayStation VR, Oculus Quest, Valve Index, Oculus Rift S. Back row: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, HTC Vive Pro. (Only headsets from the front row made our recommended-in-2019 list.) (credit: Sam Machkovech)

Virtual reality as a consumer-grade tech isn’t going anywhere if the PC gaming titans at Valve Corporation have anything to say about it.

Today marks the company’s launch of its own VR system, the Valve Index, and it’s easily the company’s biggest hardware launch ever. Valve has previously sold $50 controllers and set-top boxes, and they’ve partnered with other hardware makers to launch things like computers. But the Valve Index is another level entirely—it’s priced at $999 for a full kit, built top to bottom at Valve’s Seattle-area headquarters.

What’s more, its launch day allocation sold out even before I’d written my lengthy hands-on impressions article last month. Not bad for a gadget

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Signs from above: Drone with projector successfully trolls car AI

Signs from above: Drone with projector successfully trolls car AI

Enlarge / A Renault Captur in more idealistic conditions. (credit: Renault)

After a recent demo using GNSS spoofing confused a Tesla, a researcher from [email protected] reached out about an alternative bit of car tech foolery. The [email protected] team recently demonstrated an exploit against a Mobileye 630 PRO Advanced Driver Assist System (ADAS) installed on a Renault Captur, and the exploit relies on a drone with a projector faking street signs.

The Mobileye is a Level 0 system, which means it informs a human driver but does not automatically steer, brake, or accelerate the vehicle. This unfortunately limits the “wow factor” of [email protected]’s exploit video—below, we can see the Mobileye incorrectly inform its driver that the speed limit has jumped from 30km/h to 90km/h (18.6 to 55.9 mph), but we don’t get to see the Renault take off like a scalded dog in the middle of a college campus.

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Shaky Camera Returns: Here’s the Galaxy Note 10+

Shaky Camera Returns: Here’s the Galaxy Note 10+


Thanks to Twitter, we could be experiencing our first eyes-on with the Galaxy Note 10+ this morning, previously reported to be called the Galaxy Note 10 Pro. Honestly, I’m cool with “+.”

Besides not being great quality photos, we can see that this device matches up nicely with the CG renders that came before it. On the frontside we have a single centered cutout for the front-facing camera, as well as what looks to be a three rear-facing camera setup on the back.

This all aligns with the renders and previous reports, with exception to the name. As of right now, we’re still anticipating two Note 10 variants, but information has been limited on the non-Plus model.

For anyone who was worried about the Note series losing its buttons, these photos do show physical buttons on the left and right side of the device. The only … Read the rest

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Podcast: Cancel the Fold

Podcast: RCS Finally, Maybe.


On this episode of the Droid Life Show, we’re discussing the latest in Android news from the past couple of weeks. We have what may be real Galaxy Note 10 photos to scratch our heads over, RCS rollout from Google without carrier involvement, Verizon preparing to lock phones, and all sorts of 5G news.

We also want to dive into topics like Google’s auto-delete option for your history, how bad Motorola is at updating phones in 2019, and why Tim is sad about Android updates these days. Poor, Tim.

Trivia is back again!

We’ll be live at 10:00AM Pacific (1PM Eastern).

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DEAL: SanDisk’s 128GB MicroSD for $16.99, 64GB for $9.99

DEAL: SanDisk’s 128GB MicroSD for $16.99, 64GB for $9.99


External storage is cheap, but Newegg has even cheaper prices than usual on SanDisk Ultra A1 microSD cards. The 128GB card has dropped from $20 to $16.99 and the 64GB version has dropped from $15 to $9.99. Those might be all-time low prices and they are good for a few more hours.

You know what to do.

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Federal bill would allow clean energy companies to structure like oil companies

Renewable electricity beat out coal for the first time in April

Enlarge / Wind turbines near Palm Springs, California. (credit: nate2b / Flickr)

A remarkable thing happened in the US in April. For the first time ever, renewable electricity generation beat out coal-fired electricity generation on a national level, according to the Energy Information Agency (EIA). While renewable energy—including hydro, wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass—constituted 23 percent of the nation’s power supply, coal-fired electricity only contributed 20 percent of our power supply.

There are seasonal reasons for this happening in April. Wind power generation tends to be higher in spring and fall, hydroelectric generation usually peaks as winter snow melts, and lengthening days mean more solar power can be fed to the grid.

In addition, people use less electricity in spring, as it’s not cold enough to need a lot of heating and not warm enough to require lots of air conditioner use. Coal-fired power plant owners, expecting this

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Author pulls software that used deep learning to virtually undress women

Author pulls software that used deep learning to virtually undress women

Enlarge (credit: AntonioGuillem)

On Wednesday, a Vice article alerted the world to the creation of DeepNude, a computer program that uses neural networks to transform an image of a clothed woman into a realistic rendering of what she might look like naked.

The software attracted widespread condemnation. This is an “invasion of sexual privacy,” legal scholar Danielle Citron told Vice.

The software’s anonymous creator explained how it worked to Vice’s Samantha Cole:

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No more lumps: Let physics be your guide to making the perfect crepe

No more lumps: Let physics be your guide to making the perfect crepe

Enlarge / Batter must be distributed evenly to get uniform thickness in a perfect crepe. (credit: Mark Boster/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images)

Order a crepe from a professional vendor and they’ll likely cook it on a blade, a flat heated surface that distributes the batter evenly to get just the right consistency in the final crepe: uniform thickness with no unsightly lumps. But home cooks typically make crepes in a frying pan, which can make the process a wee bit trickier.

Still, no worries, all you home-cooking crepe lovers—physics has come to the rescue. According to the latest experiment results of two scientists, the trick is all in the wrist. They described their research in a recent paper published in Physical Review Fluids.

It all started when co-author Mathieu Sellier of the University of Canterbury in New Zealand expressed frustration to his wife that he could never get his

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Go big and go home: The BMW X7 reviewed

Go big and go home: The BMW X7 reviewed

Back in the days when BMW attended auto shows, it would show off a dizzying array of vehicles. Coupes, roadsters, hybrids, SUVs, fastbacks—you name it, and BMW sold it. Yet there was one glaring omission as one wandered through BMW’s cornucopia of cars: a three-row SUV. If you were a fan of the Ultimate Driving Machine but had outgrown the X5 due to an accumulation of children and/or stuff, there was no choice but to look elsewhere for your luxury SUV needs. With the launch of the full-size, three-row X7, BMW has not only given its fans a reason to upgrade—it has built an SUV that anyone looking at a GLC, Q7, XC90, or Range Rover Discovery should look long and hard at.

At first glance, the X7 cuts a familiar profile. It has the same general outlines as the compact X3

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