After trailer outcry, Sonic the Hedgehog director tells fans to expect “changes”

After trailer outcry, Sonic the Hedgehog director tells fans to expect “changes”

On Thursday, 48 hours after the world finally saw what this November’s Sonic The Hedgehog live-action movie would look like, its director took to Twitter with a surprise announcement: that’s, uh, not what the live-action movie will look like.

“Thank you for the support,” film director Jeff Fowler posted to Twitter on Thursday afternoon. “And the criticism. The message is loud and clear… you aren’t happy with the design, and you want changes. It’s going to happen.”

After acknowledging the support of film studio Paramount and game company Sega, Fowler included a pretty telling hashtag: “#gottafixfast.” It’s not just a riff on the series’ iconic “gotta go fast” slogan” but rather a stark admission that Fowler’s vague suggestion for

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Xbox’s new Code of Conduct: yes to “get wrecked,” “potato aim,” no to hate

Xbox’s new Code of Conduct: yes to “get wrecked,” “potato aim,” no to hate

Enlarge / An artist’s approximation of an Xbox Live player crossing the lines as set by Microsoft in a new Xbox Community Standards page this week. (credit: Getty Images / Sam Machkovech)

An apparently new page at the official Xbox website, dubbed “Community Standards for Xbox,” was recently unearthed by members of the ResetEra gaming forums. The page appears to be the first of its kind from a console online-gaming provider, as it translates the legalese of Microsoft’s existing “services agreement” to straight-up “l33t” speak.

The page, which has yet to see a signal-boost from Xbox representatives like Phil Spencer or Larry “Major Nelson” Hyrb, goes into detail about 10 major points in Microsoft’s Services Agreement—the form you must scroll through and click “accept” on when creating any Xbox or Microsoft account. These 10 points have been rephrased slightly to better reflect an Xbox use case and are

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HoloLens 2 dev kits: $3,500, or $99/month, with Azure credits, Unity trials

HoloLens 2 dev kits: $3,500, or $99/month, with Azure credits, Unity trials

Enlarge / Microsoft HoloLens 2. (credit: Microsoft)

The second-generation HoloLens 2 was announced back in February. At the time, Microsoft only disclosed commercial pricing for the greatly improved augmented reality headset: $3,500. This is $1,500 less than the commercial edition of the first edition but $500 more than the developer edition.

Today, the company revealed the developer pricing. It’ll be that same $3,500, or $99 per month. Whichever payment option is chosen, the development edition will come with a few extras that the commercial edition does not: $500 of credit for Azure services as well as three months of Unity Pro and the PIXYZ CAD plugin. The developer headset will also be limited to one per person and won’t be licensed for commercial usage, though as best we can tell, the hardware will be literally identical.

Monthly pricing is available for the commercial edition, too: for $125/month,

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Department of Justice opens investigation into failed carbon-capture plant

Department of Justice opens investigation into failed carbon-capture plant

Enlarge / Cranes stand at the construction site for Southern Co.’s Kemper County power plant near Meridian, Miss., on Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014. (credit: Gary Tramontina/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Earlier this week, the Department of Justice (DOJ) notified Southern Company that it is opening an investigation “related to the Kemper County energy facility,” according to Southern’s most recent financial statement (PDF).

The Mississippi-based facility had received $387 million in federal grants to build a state-of-the-art coal gasification and carbon-capture power plant (otherwise known as an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, or IGCC, plant). But in 2017, Southern’s subsidiary, Mississippi Power, decided to scrap the cutting-edge tech and only use the power plant to burn cheaper natural gas, in a major blow to the proponents of carbon capture.

Bad timing

Kemper was a complicated project. It was located near a lignite coal mine, which was intended to serve Kemper exclusively.

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#TBT: The Story of How the OG DROID Helped Save Three Companies

#TBT: The Story of How the OG DROID Helped Save Three Companies


In April of 2011, Wired published a brilliant piece on the original Motorola DROID, a phone that many of you may have owned back in the day. Well, as cool as we all know that phone is and was, did you know that the OG DROID helped save three companies? Oh, indeed it did!

In 2009, Motorola, Android, and Verizon were struggling. iPhone was dominating, and at that time, it still wasn’t for sale through Verizon. So here are three companies, desperate for something major, then all of a sudden, here comes this somewhat quirky looking Android-powered slider phone with a marketing campaign that kicked the sh*t out of everything.

Everything iDon’t, DROID DOES.

Stepping further back, Wired’s original piece even goes over the design meetings and decisions made that led up to what we now know as the OG DROID. The following is an excerpt.

Now Jha

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Putin signs “Internet sovereignty” bill that expands censorship

Putin signs “Internet sovereignty” bill that expands censorship

Enlarge / Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks on April 27, 2019, in Beijing. (credit: Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images)

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a controversial “Internet sovereignty” bill that strengthens the government’s control over the Russian Internet.

Back in March, we reported on Putin signing two other bills that gave the Russian government the power to punish people for the online publication of fake news and insults to public officials. The latest bill focuses lower on the technology stack.

The New America Foundation published a detailed analysis of the bill back in February:

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Suicide’s “contagiousness” is complicated—studies on 13 Reasons Why prove it

Suicide’s “contagiousness” is complicated—studies on 13 Reasons Why prove it

Enlarge / Katherine Langford, Derek Luke, Dylan Minnette, Alisha Boe, Miles Heizer, and Brian Yorkey attend #NETFLIXFYSEE Event For “13 Reasons Why” Season 2 – Inside at Netflix FYSEE At Raleigh Studios on June 1, 2018 in Los Angeles, Calif. (credit: Getty | Presley, Ann)

A study out this week suggests that the release of the first season of Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why series in 2017 led to a small but notable uptick in teen suicides. The finding seems to confirm widespread apprehensions among mental health experts and advocates that a suicide “contagion” could spread from the teen drama, which centers around a 17-year-old girl’s suicide and includes graphic details. But the study contains significant caveats, and the findings should be interpreted cautiously.

The study was published online by the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and conducted by a research team led by epidemiologist

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Ex-YouTube engineer reveals how video site worked to kill off Internet Explorer 6

Ex-YouTube engineer reveals how video site worked to kill off Internet Explorer 6

(credit: Aurich Lawson)

The year is 2009. YouTube, four years old, has become the Web’s leading video site. Though Internet Explorer 6 was far from current—it had been superseded by versions 7 and 8—it nonetheless made up some 18 percent of YouTube’s traffic. These were, after all, the dark days of Windows XP; corporations had overwhelmingly stuck with Windows XP in spite of the release of Windows Vista, and Windows 7 was still some months from release. Many organizations still running XP appeared to be wishing for a kind of computational stasis: they wanted to be able to run Windows XP and Internet Explorer 6 forever, unchanging, which would greatly simplify their maintenance and support costs.

But Internet Explorer 6 was nearly eight years old and seriously showing its age. On its release, the browser had a legitimate claim to be the best, fastest, most standards compliant, and most

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Detective Pikachu and Friends Come to Playground for Select Phones

Detective Pikachu and Friends Come to Playground for Select Phones


Four Pokemon that are set to appear to the upcoming Detective Pikachu movie are now available in Playground for Pixel phones, plus select LG and Moto phones. Once downloaded, you can have Detective Pikachu, Mr. Mime, Charizard, and Jigglypuff placed in your world using your supported device.

Apparently, these little Playmoji feature machine learning, able to react to your own facial expressions.

Thanks to ARCore’s motion tracking, light estimation and ability to understand the real world, they feel like they’re really there with you. You can even take a selfie with Detective Pikachu and share a smile as he reacts to your facial expressions in real time via machine learning.

I’m still creeped out by Mr. Mime, but Pikachu sure is cute.

Google Play Link

// Google

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Here’s the OnePlus 7 Pro in ‘Nebula Blue’ and ‘Mirror Grey’

Here’s the OnePlus 7 Pro in ‘Nebula Blue’ and ‘Mirror Grey’


Thanks to Ishan Agarwal on Twitter, we’re getting our best look yet at the upcoming OnePlus 7 Pro in two colors, Nebula Blue and Mirror Grey.

As we can see, the OP7 Pro appears to feature the expected triple rear camera setup (camera samples here), all display frontside (with in-display fingerprint reader resting beneath), and an overall minimal exterior. For comparison, the phone looks very much like a Galaxy S10+, but without the camera cutout, which is exceptionally sweet.

As for the front-facing camera, it’s also hidden behind the display, assumably popping out from the top only when in use.

The OnePlus 7 Pro is scheduled to be launched on May 14.

Are we liking what we see? I am.

// @ishanagarwal24

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